Video Game Comic and Blog
Video Game Comic and Blog


"A video game comic and blog that would have been awesome and relevant 10 years ago. Maybe." -Famous Website

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Rabbit Rock-Out!

july 6, 2012

Sometimes when you explore in a game, you are bound to find really cool and interesting secrets tucked away in corners; treasures that the creators so painstakingly hid away for players to serendipitously stumble upon. Little character gestures, art, music or wonderful in-game goodies that make you feel warm and fuzzy inside. It's as if you feel a kindred bond to whoever planted all those wonderful Easter Eggs (just for you!), even if in only in some minute fashion.

What happens though if the Easter Eggs are less whimsical and wonderful in nature and rather something far more wretched? Something you couldn't possibly want?? And not only that, but you are given the feeling that it is YOUR fault for wanting those precious eggs? Yes...yes...This is your doing after all.

Having recently passed Swords and Sworcery, I have to say I am pretty impressed with the game as a whole. The art style is really stunning and it has a certain charm with its unique writing style and Tweet-delivered monologue from the main cast. The music doesn't fail to impress and they are right to give so much recognition to their composer Jim Guthrie. Starting out the adventure as you step foot into the world with such a superb opening track just invites you with open arms to see what the world has to offer.

That isn't to say the game is without its shortcomings. The one complaint Pie lobbed against the game was that in having virtually every screen serve a definite purpose, it lacked depth. You are given a taste of a world to explore, but when everything is there for a reason, it seems less interesting. It would be nice to explore the environment just for the sake of exploration instead of having virtually every screen serve to propel the game forward.

The depth of the game comes into question because the environment is the biggest draw. The puzzles are straightforward and the combat is very simple. Since the experience itself is so alluring, it would have worked wonders if there was more to immerse yourself in. Of course, that always seems to be the problem with games you enjoy; it will be too short.

Rabbit Rock-Out!

july 6, 2012

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